Archive for Uncategorized

It’s Seed Time

                 

It is time to think about Seeds!  Here at Dunvegan we choose our seed companies very carefully, our selection includes:

McKenzie Seeds & Livingston Seeds – Manitoba Since 1896 A.E. McKenzie Co. has been a leader and innovator in the Canadian Gardening industry. Now Canada’s #1 Packet Seed Company, specializing in flower and vegetable seeds.  They are conscious and responsive to the growing concerns involved with food: cost, quality and safety.  Non-GMO, and carry organic seeds.

McKenzie Heritage and  Heirloom Seeds –  Manitoba  All seed is open pollinated, non-hybrid, non-GMO, untreated, natural seed. Heirloom Seeds, also called Heritage Seeds, are open-pollinated varieties that are usually at least 50 years old. They specialize in rare & endangered heirloom vegetable, flower & herb seed.

Pacific Northwest Seeds – Vernon, BC   Seed is of the highest quality and vitality with an excellent selection of vegetables, herbs and flowers, suited for Western Canada’s climates.

West Coast Seeds, Vancouver, BC  Untreated seeds for organic gardening, non-GMO. Choose from varieties of open-pollinated and hybrid vegetable seeds. West Coast Seeds features certified organic and heirloom seeds for growing, just about any vegetable seed you would like to grow.

Burpee Seeds, USA  Proud to have delivered the finest quality, non-GMO varieties in home gardening for over 140 years. They are a company of gardeners, for gardeners, and guarantee each and every product.

Renee’s Garden, California  The garden to table seed company. Offering the varieties that are very special for home gardeners, based on great flavor, easy culture and exceptional garden performance.

Mr. Fothergill’s has established itself as one of the most recognized seed brands available today. Commitment to their customers and striving for the best possible quality.

Fall Leaves

 

After this past week with incredible temperatures hopefully you got the last of your gardening done, but you might be asking yourself: What do I do with these tree leaves all over the ground?

Great question and here at Dunvegan we have a few options:

  • Use the lawnmower and go over them, it chops them into finer, smaller pieces and as the leaves decompose they release nitrogen for the lawn. Lawn food. You must chop them into finer pieces because left whole the leaves are too heavy and they could smother your lawn.
  • You could leave them whole and use them as mulch over other plants. Ideal for covering and giving a layer of protection to strawberries, raspberry or blueberry roots or a covering for perennials.
  • Compost them. If you mix the leaves and the grass cuttings those 2 things will produce a fine mulch to add to the garden next spring.  Just layer the 2 – use approximately 3-4 inches of leaves and then a layer of grass clippings then leaves, then grass – you get the idea.
  • Add them to the soil – dig some leaves into your soil – it will give it a boost and provide great living conditions for earthworms.

If you have no leaves go check out the neighbours yard, I’m quite sure they will share with you!